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Category: writings

Sensing Shared Places: Designing a Mobile Audio Streaming Environment

papers.jpgSensing Shared Places: Designing a mobile audio streaming environment by Rui Chaves and Pedro Rebelo :: This paper addresses mobile audio streaming in the context of sharing a sense of place. This action is mediated by the network, the body and remote listening. These elements are essential in the concept and design of a platform for audio transmission ( liveshout ), that aims at intersecting mobility within the realms of radio, network and transmission art.

The paper is available for download here . Continue reading


Oct 23, 2011
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Interference Journal’s First Issue

migone_front.jpgInterference Journal is a journal that looks at the role of sound in cultural practices. The first issue is now live and can be viewed at here.

The title of the inaugural issue of Interference – An Ear Alone is Not a Being: Embodied Mediation in Audio Culture – acknowledges acoustic practices that involve not just the ear but a corporeal body that senses, resonates, transduces and responds to sound, and furthermore, seeks to emphasize the legacy of this embodied listening subject in the practices, media, and conceptual frameworks that make up audio cultures. ‘Embodied mediation’ presumes a reciprocal process: the texts in this issue explore not only how listening experiences and acoustic practices are shaped by corporeality, but also attend to the many ways in which those processes work upon that body, through psychophysical affect and the representation and encoding of listening subjects in acoustic performances, technologies and cultural artefacts. — From “Editorial” by Rachel O’Dwyer


Sep 2, 2011
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The First Computer Musician

score_max1-blog427.jpgThe First Computer Musician by R. Luke Dubois :: an article in the New York Times: 06/08/2011 ::

If the difference between 1911 and 2011 is electricity and computation, then Max Mathews is one of the five most important musicians of the 20th Century. – Miller Puckette

photo by Roger Linn

In 1957 a 30-year-old engineer named Max Mathews got an I.B.M. 704 mainframe computer at the Bell Telephone Laboratories in Murray Hill, N. J., to generate 17 seconds of music, then recorded the result for posterity. While not the first person to make sound with a computer, Max was the first one to do so with a replicable combination of hardware and software that allowed the user to specify what tones he wanted to hear. This piece of music, called “The Silver Scale” and composed by a colleague at Bell Labs named Newman Guttman, was never intended to be a masterpiece. It was a proof-of-concept, and it laid the groundwork for a revolutionary advancement in music, the reverberations of which are felt everywhere today….

Read more: here.


Jun 13, 2011
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“Soundw(e)ave” by Christy Matson

soundweave_installation1.jpgFrom The New Materiality by Nathaniel Stern, Furtherfield.org; a review of the exhibition The New Materiality: Digital Dialogues at the Boundaries of Contemporary Craft:

Soundw(e)ave, (Christy Matson’s) piece on show, is a self-referential textile, where the actual sounds of computerized Jacquard looms were used to create woven compositions. Her noisy sound waves were turned into three patterned pieces of fabric, made by hand-operated, computer-assisted and fully automated (Jacquard) looms, respectively – each weave growing progressively denser with the more advanced technologies used in their production. The piece, says Matson, was a huge turning point in her practice; it pointed her towards a kind of digital craftsmanship, where she was better able to place value on the ideas, materials and skillfulness needed to be an artisan across contemporary digital, craft and art domains. Continue reading


May 19, 2011
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Until The Next Revolution

Vague Terrain 19: Schematic as Score

fabelphonetikum-schematic.pngVague Terrain 19: Schematic as Score; curated and edited by Derek Holzer: Over the past few years, a strong reaction against the sterile world of laptop sound and video has inspired a new interest in analog processes, and a fresh exploration of the pioneers of the electronic arts during the pre-digital era of the 1960s and 1970s. Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or freely downloadable — through a long, rigorous process of self-education in electronics. John Cage once quipped that Tcherepnin’s synthesizer system was “the best musical composition that Serge had ever made”, and it is precisely Cage’s reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterministic possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed. Continue reading


May 2, 2011
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AudioVisuology Essays

9783865606877.jpgAudiovisuology Essays 2: Histories and Theories of Audiovisual Media and Art :: Softback :: 452 pages :: illustrated :: But it online : Cornerhouse Books ::

This is the third publication in the See This Sound project which comprises stimulating essays on the current and historical position of sound and image in art and media, and their interconnection.
The point of departure for the prominent authors was the fact that our realm of experience is today shaped by an omnipresence of audio-visual products and structures, in which the cultural image and sound production are tightly entwined with one another in terms of technology, art and market strategy.

The project See this Sound explores the current diversity and long history of these syntheses and contradictions, this linking, overlapping and sometimes also irreconcilability through the perspectives of contemporary art and art and media science.


Apr 1, 2011
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Transcript of Variations #2: collage-based composition

oliv.jpgTranscript of VARIATIONS #2, The Globe :: by Jon Leidecker :: Summary:

If music initially hesitated to follow the lead of the visual arts in the field of collage, it made up for lost time in the sixties. Breakthroughs in high fidelity sound, an influx of consumer level tape recorders, and the continued influence of television building the notion of the Global Village were among the factors that led to an explosion in collage based composition. The most obvious of the shared qualities in these pieces was a tendency towards the use of World music, culled from as many disparate locations as possible. If the new availability of ethnological recordings from around the world had shattered the notion that music was a universal language, musical collage can be seen as an instant response to the rest of the world as it became unignorable – a way to explore things held in common and the potential for hybrid identities.

For more: Continue reading


Mar 27, 2011
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The Past, Present and Future of Music Video

ts1185m.jpgHenry Keazor, Thorsten Wübbena (eds.) :: Rewind, Play, Fast Forward The Past, Present and Future of the Music Video :: 2010, 280 Seiten, kart., zahlr. Abb., 29,80 € , ISBN: 978-3-8376-1185-4 :: More info at: http://www.transcript-verlag.de/ts1185/ts1185s.php

Due to shifts in the contexts of the production and presentation of the music video, more and more people start to talk about a possible end of this genre. At the same time disciplines such as visual-, film- and media-studies, art- and music-history begin to realize that despite the fact that the music video obviously has come of age, they still lack a well defined and matching methodical approach for analyzing and discussing videoclips.

For the first time this volume brings together different disciplines as well as journalists, museum curators and gallery owners in order to take a discussion of the past and present of the music video as an opportunity to reflect upon suited methodological approaches to this genre and to allow a glimpse into its future. Continue reading


Feb 23, 2011
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Cellular Automata in electronic music and sonic art

953323__727232828.jpgCellular automata in generative electronic music and sonic art: a historical and technical review :: Authors: Dave Burraston, Ernest Edmondsa ::

This paper will review electronic music and sonic art applications of Cellular automata (CA) in a historical and technical context. Algorithmic and computational processes have been of interest to artists for many years, creating an emerging culture of generative electronic art. Creating patterns and sequences is necessary for the creative artist working spatially and temporally within a chosen medium. CA are capable of a wide variety of emergent behaviours and represent an important generative tool for the artist.

The sonic artist and musician must be prepared to investigate the theoretical background of CA in order to successfully employ their vast behaviour space within compositional strategy. Continue reading


Feb 12, 2011
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Interviews

Current interview:
Robin Meier, Ali Momeni and the sound of insects

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What is this?

Networked_Music_Review (NMR) is a research blog that focuses on emerging networked musical explorations.

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NMR commissioned the following artists to create new sound art works. More...
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Net_Music_Weekly

"Two Trains" by Data-Driven DJ aka Brian Foo

Two Trains: Sonification of Income Inequality on the NYC Subway by Data-Driven DJ aka Brian Foo: The goal of this song is to emulate a ride on the New York City Subway's 2 Train ... Read more
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